Azn Badger's Blog

What About the Lysine Contingency…?

Holy Fucking Shit, It’s A Dinosaur.

You’ll have to forgive my laziness, as after spending 2 hours on the freeway just to get home from work; I really just can’t summon the strength to write anything clever or remotely interesting this evening.

Anyway, hopefully you enjoyed the video above, as I’ve found it always puts a smile on my face whenever I watch it.

Hopefully tomorrow I’ll get around to posting the Top 5 Jackie Chan Songs That Keep The Azn Badger From Stabbing People for yah’.

Such passion! How could anyone not like him?

Regardless, sorry for the retarded/non-existent post.

Thanks for dropping by!

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Metal Gear Online Is Fun. Like, REALLY Fun…

I’ve had a PS3 for less than a week now.

The only game I own at the moment, is Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots.

So far it’s pretty much all I could’ve hoped for in a next-gen, excuse me; “current-gen” Metal Gear.

Hell, for once the controls are actually, y’know; manageable…

Having played all of the “Solid” series pretty much to death, every element of the story feels like a wink from Hideo Kojima to his fans.

The scale and execution of the game’s story and cutscenes are far larger and Hollywood-ized than previous entries in the series, such that the whole thing feels a little cheesy and melodramatic, thusly making it somewhat hard to take seriously.

Huh, guess that’s actually a bad thing.

Hadn’t realized until I wrote out the words.

In either case, I’ve just reached Act 5 of Metal Gear Solid 4, and so far I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the experience.

The fan-service is just enough to be “cute” rather than forced and annoying, but I’m really hoping that everything comes together at the end for a dignified and appropriate ending.

It’s the least they could give us after the awesome-ness that was Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater.

Anyway, that’s enough about the single-player mode of Metal Gear Solid 4, let’s get to the real reason I’m making this post tonight, namely the Metal Gear Online aspect of the game.

I have to admit, upon purchasing the game, I had no idea that Metal Gear Solid 4 had any sort of online component.

How that MASSIVE bit of information managed to skirt my periphery, I honestly don’t know; but regardless, I’m glad the folks over at Konami included it.

I’m not an online gamer.

Hell, these days it’s kind of hard to call me anything more than a “nostalgic, yet casual” gamer.

Other than a fair amount of Team Fortress Classic and Counter-Strike way back in middle school, I really haven’t invested much time in online gaming.

And no, I’ve never played an MMO game before either.

Despite this, being as my PS3 is my new “toy” at the moment, I figured I would play around online for a bit to see if it was any good.

Well, other than the fact that it took me an hour or 2 to register, create my character, log-in, and then find a server to connect to, I can honestly say, it’s very good.

For me anyway.

The whole game plays out using the same control scheme as in the single-player mode, ensuring that everyone that could beat the story mode, can at least be competitive in the multiplayer mode.

For whatever reason, I feel that the third-person gameplay monumentally improves the experience when compared to a first-person shooter.

I like being able to see my character on-screen, and I also enjoy the fact that the camera system has been tweaked in such a way that it remains advantageous to the player, while at the same time doing little to prevent ambushes from behind.

In short, the camera shows as much as you are accustomed to from the single-player game, while at the same time doesn’t allow you to see your backside or flanks.

Speaking of flanking, I love how much of the game is based around getting the drop on your opponents.

Because of the camera system, ambushes are not only easy to pull-off, they also occur at a much higher rate than you’d expect from an online shooter.

I remember back in the day when I’d try to get the drop on people in Counter-Strike, only end up being shot to shit on account of my opponent’s faster and more accurate mouse handling skills.

Either that or I wouldn’t be able to hit someone because they were bunny-hopping all over the place…

*Ahem!* Anyway, though it comes as a great surprise to me, I’m really enjoying Metal Gear Online.

I love that they implemented the CQC mechanics into the gameplay.

I love that they incorporated Solid Snake as a third-party participant in some of the online matches.

And I love that after all these years I’ve finally found a multiplayer game I actually enjoy!

Anyway, sorry about the somewhat flat post, I’m busy with trying to fix my computer and play around on my PS3 at the same time…

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Global Operations: The Best Game Ever

What Global Operations is all about: Bruthas' with guns...

Global Operations is a Counter-Strike clone.

Plain and simple.

Despite this, the important thing to remember is that it is a damn good Counter-Strike clone.

Unlike this pile of fail...

Counter-Strike had already been out a few years before the release of Global Operations, and while the former may indeed have ended up being the better game, I personally had more fun plugging away at terrorists in Global Ops.

Looks kind of familiar, don’t it?

Familiar, but AWESOME.

Counter-Strike was, and in some ways, still is a phenomenon in the realm of online first-person shooters.

It’s legacy stretches on for miles, and yet anybody can see after only a few minutes of playing, that the game has it’s fare share of problems and issues.

The round-based respawn system is a pain in the ass.

Oh, man... Now you have to wait 10 minutes on account of all the campers...

The weapons, while nicely varied, are very distinctly grouped into a frustratingly polar system of “good” and “bad” types.

Well okay, maybe none of them are as bad as the Bio-Rifle in Unreal Tournament...

The fact that hopping around was a viable combat tactic was downright mind-boggling.

Global Operations addressed all of these issues and then some, resulting in a fun and fast-paced game that, while lacking the online community of Counter-Strike, was always a good time, both online and off.

The most important change that Global Operations brought to the table in terms of gameplay, was the addition of a Team Fortress-esque class system.

Unlike Counter-Strike, where the players were only differentiated by their equipment, Global Ops both restricted and endowed the player with abilities based upon which class they selected.

In all there were 6 classes altogether:

There was the basic Commando, who could handle virtually every weapon in the game except for complex explosive devices.

The Sniper, who could handle long range rifles.

The Medic, who carried a cache of healing hypodermics that could be used to restore the health of himself and his comrades, as well as resuscitate incapacitated soldiers.

The Heavy Gunner, who could handle heavy machine guns.

The Demo Man, who could handle complex explosive devices, both in terms of planting, and disabling them.

And finally The Scout, who came equipped with a multi-directional heartbeat sensor that when pointed at enemies, would display their location on the entire team’s radar.

Aside from The Sniper and Demo Man, who I honestly didn’t play as all too often, I found pretty much all of the classes in the game to be quite distinct, and very fun to handle.

Who the wouldn’t like to be able to go one round as the Heavy Gunner, tearing the opposition to shreds, only to change it up by switching to The Medic on your next respawn and play a more supportive role?

Well okay fine, I'm sure THIS GUY would ALWAYS play as the Heavy Gunner. Y'know, 'cause he's EXTREME.

It was this sense of variety that made Global Ops hard to get bored of.

Now, I mentioned a lot of issues I had with Counter-Strike, how’s about we take a look at how Global Ops addressed, eh?

When it came to the issues that players may had with the round-based respawns of Counter-Strike, Global Ops fixed it in just about every one could.

When a player is killed in Global Ops, they don’t necessarily die right away.

"There's a big difference between mostly dead, and all dead..."

Instead, players are incapacitated, whereupon they can call for a Medic as their health bar’s total value continually shrinks.

Once the bar is empty, the player dies.

Alternatively though, if the player is aware that there is no Medic around to save them, (often the case when they themselves are the Medic) they can simply choose to bleed out immediately and respawn.

Respawning in Global Ops places the player in a helicopter, or other such transport vehicle in the company of all their fallen comrades.

Yup, just kickin' it in the afterlife here with my buddy Steve...

You see, every spawn point in Global Ops is continually reinforced on a strict schedule, resulting in the occasional lucky death that results in a near instantaneous respawn.

It is during this down-time in the chopper that the player has access to the plethora of weapons and equipment available in Global Ops.

In short, Global Operations had a shit ton of weapons ranging from basic pistols, to savage-ass grenade launchers.

Can you guess all the guns?

Perhaps more importantly though, Global Operations went the extra mile by allowing players to customize their equipment with various attachments.

Like setting your Glock 18c on full-auto?

Buy an extended magazine for it.

Hell, it worked for Larry Fishburne.

Like blinding motherfuckers before you open up on ’em with a shotgun?

Slap a flashlight on that bad boy.

Good times man…

Anyway, in addition to the massive variety of weapons in Global Ops, each of these weapons were remarkably balanced.

You know any other games (besides the original Halo) where cruising around with nothing but a pistol is actually a good idea?

Oh wait, I forgot about The Specialists:

Finally, in regards to Counter-Strike’s hop-happy gameplay, Global Operations went ahead and made the gameplay more, how shall we say, “grounded.”

In fact, that’s really the only gripe that comes to mind whenever I think of Global Ops.

The bot AI was pretty good for the time, the sound effects were powerful and of great quality, the mission types were nicely varied, but the movement controls were a little sluggish.

Jumping in Global Ops resulted in what amounted to little more than a barely noticeable bit of screen jitter, as if your character was glued to the floor, but would mysteriously be struck with bouts of palsy whenever the player saw fit to tap the space bar.

Dude, that's not a wink. That's palsy...

I know, it’s a small gripe, but worth pointing out regardless.

Anyway, Global Operations was a big part of my high school days (and any time I spend hanging out with my Get Stingray cast mates), and as such I felt it deserved to be mentioned on this blog.

Indeed, wrecking people’s shit with the FAL, followed by mass sessions of spamming the “I need a Medic” audio command, were some of the best times I had on my PC…

"Medic. I need a medic. I'm hurt, and need assistance. Medic. I need a..."

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